200+ List Of Native Turtles Throughout USA [By State]

The USA has a wider variety of turtles than any other place in the world. The wildlife authorities have ensured everything to protect these reptiles and, at the same time, encouraged the public to learn more about these creatures.

The 15 leading states of the USA include hundreds of turtle species. The most common and popular turtle species are,

  • Box turtle
  • Bog turtle
  • Wood turtle
  • Spotted turtle
  • Painted turtle
  • Slider
  • Cooter
  • Diamondback terrapin
  • Map turtle
  • Musk turtle
  • Mud turtle
  • Snapping turtle
  • Softshell turtle
  • Sea turtles, etc.

If you are a turtle lover and looking forward to starting your journey as a keeper, this article is the first thing you should read. Without the primary knowledge about the turtle’s native home, habitat and lifestyle, you can not do a good job. The following article includes the native turtle lists per the state and the turtle’s profile.

So, let’s start.

Table of Contents

Native Turtles Of New York

The state of New York is famous for turtles. The state has 20 different turtle species, including sea turtles, painted turtles, softshell turtles, box turtles, bog turtles, etc.

Here is the list of New York Native turtles,

  1. Eastern Mud Turtle
  2. Spotted Turtle
  3. Bog Turtle
  4. Wood Turtle
  5. Eastern Box Turtle
  6. Common Snapping Turtle
  7. Common Musk Turtle
  8. Common Map Turtle 
  9. Northern Diamondback Terrapin
  10. Eastern Redbelly Cooter
  11. Yellow Bellied Slider
  12. Red Eared Slider
  13. Spiny Softshell Turtle
  14. Painted Turtle
  15. Blanding’s Turtle
  16. Green Sea Turtle
  17. Atlantic Hawksbill Sea Turtle
  18. Atlantic Ridley Sea Turtle
  19. Loggerhead Sea Turtle
  20. Leatherback Sea Turtle

Native Turtles Of Texas

Texas has 29 different turtle species. Among them, the box turtles, map turtles, mud turtles, musk turtles, sliders, softshell turtles, and sea turtles are quite popular.

Here is the complete list of Texas native turtles,

  1. Ornate Box Turtle
  2. Desert Box Turtle
  3. Three Toed Box Turtle
  4. Chicken Turtle
  5. Missouri River Cooter
  6. Rio Grande Cooter
  7. Texas River Cooter
  8. Cagle’s Map Turtle
  9. Mississippi Map Turtle
  10. Ouachita Map Turtle
  11. Sabine Map Turtle
  12. Texas Map Turtle
  13. Eastern Mud Turtle
  14. Rough Foot Mud Turtle
  15. Yellow Mud Turtle
  16. Common Musk Turtle
  17. Razorback Musk Turtle
  18. Big Bend Slider
  19. Red Eared Slider
  20. Painted Turtles
  21. Alligator Snapping Turtle
  22. Common Snapping Turtle
  23. Midland Smooth Softshell Turtle
  24. Spiny Softshell Turtle
  25. Texas Diamondback Terrapin
  26. Green Sea Turtle
  27. Kemp’s Ridley Sea Turtle
  28. Hawksbill Sea Turtle
  29. Loggerhead Sea Turtle

Native Turtles Of New Jersey

There are 18 turtle species in New Jersey. Such as bog turtle, box turtle, cooter, painted turtle, map turtle, mud turtle, musk turtle, wood turtle, sea turtle, etc.

Here is the complete list of New Jersey native turtles,

  1. Bog turtle
  2. Eastern Box Turtle
  3. Northern Red Bellied Cooter
  4. Northern Diamondback Terrapin
  5. Northern Map Turtle
  6. Eastern Mud Turtle
  7. Common Musk Turtle
  8. Eastern Painted Turtle
  9. Red Eared Slider
  10. Common Snapping Turtle
  11. Eastern Spiny Softshell Turtle
  12. Spotted Turtle
  13. Wood Turtle
  14. Kemp’s Ridley Sea Turtle
  15. Atlantic Hawksbill Sea Turtle
  16. Atlantic Green Sea Turtle
  17. Leatherback Sea Turtle
  18. Loggerhead Sea Turtle

Native Turtles Of Florida

The state of Florida has 30 different turtle species. Such as box turtles, chicken turtles, cooters, terrapins, sliders, painted turtles, mud turtles, map turtles, sea turtles, etc.

Here is the complete list of Florida native turtles,

  1. Chicken Turtle
  2. Red Eared Slider
  3. Yellow Bellied Slider
  4. Eastern Box Turtle
  5. Florida Box Turtle
  6. Gulf Coast Box Turtle
  7. Three Toed Box Turtle
  8. Eastern River Cooter
  9. Florida Red Bellied Cooter
  10. Peninsula Cooter
  11. Diamondback Terrapin
  12. Barbour’s Map Turtle
  13. False Map Turtle
  14. Eastern Mud Turtle
  15. Florida Mud Turtle
  16. Striped Mud Turtle
  17. Common Musk Turtle
  18. Loggerhead Musk Turtle
  19. Southern Painted Turtle
  20. Alligator Snapping Turtle
  21. Common Snapping Turtle
  22. Florida Softshell Turtle
  23. Gulf Coast Smooth Softshell Turtle
  24. Gulf Coast Spiny Softshell Turtle
  25. Spotted Turtle
  26. Green Sea Turtle
  27. Hawksbill Sea Turtle
  28. Leatherback Sea Turtle
  29. Loggerhead Sea Turtle
  30. Kemp’s Ridley Sea Turtle

Native Turtles Of Georgia

Georgia has diversity in turtles. The state has 39 different turtle species which is more than any other state. Some prominent turtles in the state are, bog turtle, snapping turtle, softshell turtle, chicken turtle, painted turtle, slider, mud turtle, map turtle, musk turtle, cooter, terrapin, sea turtle, etc.

Here is the complete list of Georgia native turtles,

  1. Bog Turtle
  2. Florida Softshell Turtle
  3. Eastern Spiny Softshell Turtle
  4. Common Snapping Turtle
  5. Alligator Snapping Turtle
  6. Eastern Painted Turtle
  7. Western Painted Turtle
  8. Southern Painted Turtle
  9. Midland Painted Turtle
  10. Spotted Turtle
  11. Eastern Chicken Turtle
  12. Florida Chicken Turtle
  13. Western Chicken Turtle
  14. Eastern Mud Turtle
  15. Florida Mud Turtle
  16. Mississippi Mud Turtle
  17. Barbour’s Map Turtle
  18. Common Map Turtle
  19. Alabama Map Turtle
  20. Three Striped Mud Turtle
  21. Diamondback Terrapin
  22. Eastern RIver Cooter
  23. Florida Cooter
  24. Florida Red Bellied Cooter
  25. Loggerhead Musk Turtle
  26. Stripe Neck Musk Turtle
  27. Common Musk Turtle
  28. Gulf Coast Box Turtle
  29. Three Toed Box Turtle
  30. Eastern Box Turtle
  31. Florida Box Turtle
  32. Cumberland Slider
  33. Yellow Bellied Slider
  34. Red Eared Slider
  35. Loggerhead Sea Turtle
  36. Hawksbill Sea Turtle
  37. Kemp’s Ridley Sea Turtle
  38. Green Sea Turtle
  39. Leatherback Sea Turtle

Native Turtles Of California

You will find 10 different turtle species in California. Such as pond turtles, softshell turtles, snapping turtles, painted turtles, sliders, and sea turtles.

Here is the complete list of California native turtles,

  1. Western Pond Turtle
  2. Texas Spiny Softshell Turtle
  3. Common Snapping Turtle
  4. Western Painted Turtle
  5. Red Eared Slider
  6. Green Sea Turtle
  7. Hawksbill Sea Turtle
  8. Olive Ridley Sea Turtle
  9. Loggerhead Sea Turtle
  10. Leatherback Sea Turtle

Native Turtles Of Oregon

The state of Oregon has 7 native turtles. Some are pond turtles, painted turtles, snapping turtles, sliders, and sea turtles.

Here is the complete list of Oregon native turtles,

  1. Common Snapping Turtle
  2. Red Eared Slider
  3. Western Pond Turtle
  4. Western Painted Turtle
  5. Green Sea Turtle
  6. Leatherback Sea Turtle
  7. Loggerhead Sea Turtle

Native Turtles Of Washington State

Washington State has 9 types of turtles, Such as painted turtles, pond turtles, snapping turtles, softshell turtles, and sea turtles.

Here is the complete list of Washington state native turtles,

  1. Common Snapping Turtle
  2. Red Eared Slider
  3. Spiny Softshell Turtle
  4. Western Painted Turtle
  5. Western Pond Turtle
  6. Green Sea Turtle
  7. Leatherback Sea Turtle
  8. Loggerhead Sea Turtle
  9. Olive Ridley Sea Turtle

Native Turtles Of Pennsylvania

Pennslyvania State has 15 different turtle species. Such as, Blanding’s turtles, bog turtles, box turtles, sliders, map turtles, painted turtles, map turtles, softshell turtles, wood turtles, etc.

Here is the complete list of Pennslyvania native turtles,

  1. Blanding’s Turtle
  2. Bog Turtle
  3. Eastern Box Turtle
  4. Northern Red Bellied Cooter
  5. Northern Map Turtle
  6. Eastern Mud Turtle
  7. Eastern Musk Turtle
  8. Painted Turtle
  9. Common Snapping Turtle
  10. Midland Smooth Softshell Turtle
  11. Eastern Spiny Softshell Turtle
  12. Spotted Turtle
  13. Wood Turtle
  14. Red Eared Slider
  15. Yellow Bellied Slider

Native Turtles Of North Carolina

North Carolina has 22 different kinds of turtle species. Besides sea turtles, the state has turtles like bog turtles, box turtles, mud turtles, spotted turtles, sliders, cooters, etc.

Here is the complete list of North Carolina native turtles,

  1. Bog Turtle
  2. Eastern Box Turtle
  3. Eastern Chicken Turtle
  4. Eastern River Cooter
  5. Florida Cooter
  6. Northern Red Bellied Cooter
  7. Diamondback Terrapin
  8. Striped Mud Turtle
  9. Eastern Mud Turtle
  10. Common Musk Turtle
  11. Striped Neck Musk Turtle
  12. Eastern Painted Turtle
  13. Red Eared Slider
  14. Yellow Bellied Slider
  15. Common Snapping Turtle
  16. Spiny Softshell Turtle
  17. Spotted Turtle
  18. Green Sea Turtle
  19. Leatherback Sea Turtle
  20. Hawksbill Sea Turtle
  21. Loggerhead Sea Turtle
  22. Kemp’s Ridley’s Sea Turtle

Native Turtles Of South Carolina

The state of South Carolina has 19 native turtles. Such as bog turtles, box turtles, cooters, softshell turtles, terrapins, mud turtles, musk turtles, painted turtles, sea turtles, etc.

Here is the complete list of South Carolina native turtles,

  1. Bog Turtle
  2. Eastern Box Turtle
  3. Chicken Turtle
  4. Eastern River Cooter
  5. Florida Cooter
  6. Diamondback Terrapin
  7. Eastern Mud Turtle
  8. Striped Mud Turtle
  9. Common Musk Turtle
  10. Eastern Painted Turtle
  11. Yellow Bellied Slider
  12. Common Snapping Turtle
  13. Florida Softshell Turtle
  14. Spiny Softshell Turtle
  15. Green Sea Turtle
  16. Hawksbill Sea Turtle
  17. Kemp’s Ridley Sea Turtle
  18. Leatherback Sea Turtle
  19. Loggerhead Sea Turtle

Native Turtles Of Michigan

Michigan State has 10 native turtle species. Such as Blanding’s turtle, map turtles, musk turtles, snapping turtles, painted turtles, wood turtles, spotted turtles, box turtles, etc.

Here is the complete list of Michigan native turtles,

  1. Blanding’s Turtle
  2. Common Map Turtle
  3. Common Musk Turtle
  4. Common Snapping Turtle
  5. Eastern Box Turtle
  6. Painted Turtle
  7. Red Eared Slider
  8. Spiny Softshell Turtle
  9. Spotted Turtle
  10. Wood Turtle

Turtle Kentucky

Kentucky State has 13 native turtle species. Such as, softshell turtles, snapping turtles, mud turtles, musk turtles, map turtles, painted turtles, sliders, and box turtles.

Here is the complete list of Kentucky native turtles,

  1. Smooth Softshell Turtle
  2. Spiny Softshell Turtle
  3. Common Snapping Turtle
  4. Alligator Snapping Turtle
  5. Eastern Mud Turtle
  6. Common Musk Turtle
  7. Midland Painted Turtle
  8. Common Map Turtle
  9. Ouachita Map Turtle
  10. False Map Turtle
  11. Eastern River Cooter
  12. Red Eared Slider
  13. Eastern Box Turtle

Turtles Of Oklahoma

Oklahoma State has 17 native turtles. Such as box turtles, chicken turtles, cooters, map turtles, mud turtles, musk turtles, sliders, snapping turtles, and softshell turtles.

Here is the complete list of Oklahoma native turtles,

  1. Ornate Box Turtle
  2. Three Toed Box Turtle
  3. Western Chicken Turtle
  4. Eastern River Cooter
  5. Common Map Turtle
  6. Mississippi Map Turtle
  7. Ouachita Map Turtle
  8. Mississippi Mud Turtle
  9. Yellow Mud Turtle
  10. Common Musk Turtle
  11. Razorback Musk Turtle
  12. Painted Turtle
  13. Red Eared Slider
  14. Alligator Snapping Turtle
  15. Common Snapping Turtle
  16. Midland Smooth Softshell Turtle
  17. Spiny Softshell Turtle

Snapping Turtle

Common Snapping Turtle

Scientific Name: Chelydra s. serpentina

Average Size: 8 – 20 inches

Average Lifespan: 50 – 75 years

Habitat: River, marshes, lakes, shallow ponds, streams, etc.

Diet: Fish, dead animals. Insects, worms, small mammals, plants, etc.

Physical Appearance: You can easily spot a common snapping turtle by its monstrous appearance. The creature has a massive head, razor-like bead, long saw-toothed tail, keels on the shell, and stocky legs with large claws.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Intermediate to Expert

Average Price: $20 – $40

Alligator Snapping Turtle

Scientific Name: Macroclemys Temmincki

Average Size: 15 – 26 inches

Average Lifespan: More than 70 years

Habitat: Deep water bodies

Diet: Fish, frog, mice, etc.

Physical Appearance: You will know once you spot an alligator snapping turtle. The creature looks like a beast. It has sharp jaws, a razor-like beak and an overall gray shade on its body.

Conservation Status: Endangered

Care Level: Intermediate to Expert

Average Price: $25 – $100

Get the care sheet and all information on snapping turtles from this link.

Musk Turtle

Common Musk Turtle

Scientific Name: Sternotherus odoratus

Average Size: 3 – 5 inches

Average Lifespan: More than 50 years

Habitat: Permanent and slow-moving water bodies like rivers, ponds, streams, clean water lakes, etc.

Diet: Insect, amphibians, worms, small mammals, greens, etc.

Physical Appearance: Musk turtles have an unmarked carapace ranging from black, dark brown to gray-green. These turtles have dark pointy heads with two yellow stripes running on them. The fleshy barbels on the chin help the species release a foul odor to defend the enemies.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Intermediate

Average Price: $20 – $100

Razorback Musk Turtle

Scientific Name: Sternotherus Carinatus

Average Size: 5 – 6 inches

Average Lifespan: More than 20 years

Habitat: Swamps and slow-moving water bodies with vegetation

Diet: Shellfish, mollusk, crustaceans, etc.

Physical Appearance: Razor-like hump on the back is why this species is called a razor-back musk turtle. The carapace of these turtles is brown to olive, and the skin is gray with black dots.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $60 – $500

Loggerhead Musk Turtle

Scientific Name: Sternotherus minor

Average Size: 3 – 5 inches

Average Lifespan: 20 years

Habitat: Snags, shallow areas, lakes, ponds, etc.

Diet: Worm, mollusk, insect, pellets, leafy veggies, etc.

Physical Appearance: Of course, these fellow musk turtles have large heads. Also, they have grey skin with black speckles and a light brown shell with keels running at the centre.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $100 – $250

Stripe Neck Musk Turtle

Scientific Name: Sternotherus Minor Peltifer

Average Size: 3 – 4 inches

Average Lifespan: Around 20 years

Habitat: Wetlands, creeks, springs, ponds, lakes, etc.

Diet: Beetles, flies, dead fish, clams, algae, etc.

Physical Appearance: Brown to dark olive, strongly arched shell is a noticeable physical characteristic of the stripe neck musk turtles. The plastron of these turtles is yellow. Both the upper and lower shells can be randomly spotted or spotless.

Conservation Status: Not Extinct

Care Level: Beginner

Catch more detail on musk turtles from these articles.

Mud Turtle

Eastern Mud Turtle

Scientific Name: Kinosternon s. Subrubrum

Average Size: 3 – 7 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 50 years

Habitat: Shallow and slow-moving clean bogs, marshes, rivers, and swamps

Diet: Small fish, mollusk, plants, etc.

Physical Appearance: The common musk turtles are plain looking. Their carapace is kind of flat, and color ranges from yellow to black, and patternless. The heads of the species can be white to yellow.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $30 – $200

Rough Footed Mud Turtle

Scientific Name: Kinosternon Hirtipes

Average Size: 5 – 7.5 inches

Average Lifespan: 20 – 50 years

Habitat: Mountain streams, low lakes, etc.

Diet: Fish, mollusk, insects, algae, vegetation, etc.

Physical Appearance: Like all mud turtles, the rough footed ones also have short and fleshy barbels on their chin. The carapace of these turtles is brown or olive, but the skin and the plastron are the same color.

Conservation Status: Threatened

Care Level: Beginner

Yellow Mud Turtle

Scientific Name: Kinosternon Flavescens Flavescens

Average Size: 3 – 5 inches

Average Lifespan: More than 40 years

Habitat: Ponds, rivers, marshes, water-filled ditches, sloughs, lakes, flooded fields, etc.

Diet: Crustaceans, mollusks, small fish, insects, etc.

Physical Appearance: The name of these turtles came from the yellowish appearance around their faces and the yellow plastron. The carapaces of the species are olive and have no distinct markings.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Intermediate

Average Price: $35 – $300

Striped Mud Turtle

Scientific Name: Kinosternon baurii

Average Size: 4 – 5 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 50 years

Habitat: Brackish water sources like swamps, wetlands, etc.

Diet: Leafy green, insect, worm, etc.

Physical Appearance: The oval shaped shells of the striped mud turtles are dark brown and have yellow stripes.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $75 – $450

Florida Mud Turtle

Scientific Name: Kinosternon subrubrum steindachneri

Average Size: 2.5 – 5 inches

Average Lifespan: 20 years

Habitat: River, swamps, and other slow-moving water bodies

Diet: Worm, commercial pellets, dark leafy vegetables, etc.

Physical Appearance: Unmarked oval shells and bright stripes at the back of the eyes are noticeable features of Florida mud turtles.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Intermediate

Average Price: $100 – $300

Mississippi Mud Turtle

Scientific Name: Kinosternon Subrubrum Hippocrepis

Average Size: 3 – 5 inches

Average Lifespan: More than 30 years

Habitat: Shallow water bodies

Diet: Snail, shrimp, fish, vegetation, etc.

Physical Appearance: The Mississippi mud turtles have brown or dark carapace and yellow plastron with brown spots. Besides, yellow stripes run along their heads and necks. 

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Intermediate

Three Striped Mud Turtle

Scientific Name: Kinosternon Baurii

Average Size: 4 inches

Average Lifespan: More than 50 years

Habitat: Stream, canal, ditch, pond, swamp, etc.

Diet: Cabbage, algae, seed, insect, worm, etc.

Physical Appearance: Laterally running three stripes along the length of the carapace is the differentiator feature of this species. The plastron of these turtles is of olive to yellow color and has two hinges.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Intermediate

Average Price: $60 – $120

Spotted Turtle

Scientific Name: Clemmys guttata

Average Size: 3 – 5 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 150 years

Habitat: Bogs, swamps, shallow water bodies, marshes, wet meadows, streams, lakes, etc.

Diet: Crustaceans, insects, mollusks, plants, etc.

Physical Appearance: The spotted turtles have a beautiful dark shell covered with white or yellow synchronized dots. The plastrons of these turtles are usually yellow with black patches.

Conservation Status: Endangered

Care Level: Intermediate to Expert

Average Price: $75 – $500

Bog Turtle

Scientific Name: Clemmys muhlenbergii

Average Size: 3 – 5 inches

Average Lifespan: 30 – 40 years

Habitat: Mountains, wetlands with thick layers of grass or weeds and mud, wet meadows, etc.

Diet: Insect, fish, worms, vegetables, plants, etc.

Physical Appearance: The bog turtles have a dark olive or brown shell with keels running down the center. Their scutes might carry yellow or red patterns.

Conservation Status: Critically Endangered

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $250 – $450

Wood Turtle

Scientific Name: Clemmys insculpta

Average Size: 5 – 9 inches

Average Lifespan: 40 – 60 years

Habitat: Woodland habitat with streams, lakes, rivers, and ponds, which include a sandy bottom

Diet: Insect, mollusk, plants, berries, etc.

Physical Appearance: The dark brown carapace of these turtles has a roughness similar to wood. The pattern on the shell has similarities with the growth ring, and sometimes people mistake those markings for pyramiding.

Conservation Status: Endangered

Care Level: Intermediate

Average Price: $250 – $500

Box Turtle

Eastern Box Turtle

Scientific Name: Terrapene c. carolina

Average Size: 4 – 8 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 100 years

Habitat: Ponds, fields, grasslands, wetlands, meadows, woodlands, etc.

Diet: Fish, snail, worm, insect, fruit, vegetable, etc.

Physical Appearance: Eastern box turtle’s shell is slightly domed and mostly of dark brown color. The carapace often has yellow or orange spots. The plastron of this species is brown and has similar orange or yellow markings.

Conservation Status: Vulnerable 

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $100 – $500

Ornate Box Turtle

Scientific Name: Terrapine Ornata

Average Size: 2 – 6 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 40 years

Habitat: Dry prairies, oak savannas, and open habitats with deep sandy soil, grassland, etc.

Diet: Beetle, insect, caterpillar, carrion, grasshopper, berries, vegetation, etc.

Physical Appearance: Ornate box turtles have the same boxy appearance as their relatives. The shells of these turtles are domed and have orange to yellow patterns or markings.

Conservation Status: Near Threatened

Care Level: Intermediate to Expert

Average Price: $130 – $500

Desert Box Turtle

Scientific Name: Terrapene Ornata Luteola

Average Size: 4 – 6 inches

Average Lifespan: 30 – 40 years

Habitat: Open grassland and arid areas

Diet: Cactus, fruits, plants, beetles, grasshoppers, etc.

Physical Appearance: The domed shells of the desert box turtles range from brown to red. You will notice thin stripes running all over the carapace.

Conservation Status: Threatened

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $300 – $400

Three Toed Box Turtle

Scientific Name: Terrapene Carolina Triunguis

Average Size: 5 – 7 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 100 years

Habitat: Woodland, grassland, meadow, etc.

Diet: Worms, larvae, grasshopper, cricket, etc.

Physical Appearance: Three toed box turtles have a highly domed shell. Their carapace is olive to brown, and the plastron is yellow. The three toed box turtles have three claws on their rear legs, which is a distinctive feature of this species.

Conservation Status: Not Extinct

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $130 – $450

Florida Box Turtle

Scientific Name: Terrapene carolina bauri

Average Size: 4 – 8.5 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 50 years

Habitat: Forest, swamps, and marshes.

Diet: Dark leafy vegetables, plants, worms, insects, etc.

Physical Appearance: High dome and keel on the carapace is the key feature of the Florida box turtles. Also, you can spot this species by the red lines on the upper shell or the stripes on the eyes.

Conservation Status: Vulnerable

Care Level: Experienced

Average Price: $270 – $500

Gulf Coast Box Turtle

Scientific Name: Terrapene carolina major

Average Size: 5 – 8.5 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 100 years

Habitat: Brackish water, swamps, estuaries, etc.

Diet: Worms, crickets, insects, collard green, vegetables, etc.

Physical Appearance: The Gulf Coast box turtles have dark brown to black shells covered with yellow dots or stripes. Also, the carapaces have a fluted edge.

Conservation Status: Not Extinct

Care Level: Intermediate

Average Price: $120 – $450

Get a detailed care sheet for box turtles from this link.

Diamondback Terrapin

Diamondback Terrapin

Scientific Name: Malaclemys terrapin

Average Size: 4.5 – 11 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 40 years

Habitat: Brackish water sources like tidal creeks, marshes, estuaries, etc.

Diet: Crab, snail, crustaceans, plants, etc.

Physical Appearance: The carapace of the species is gray or nearly black. The diamond-like patterns on the shells are differentiating points of these turtles.

Conservation Status: Vulnerable

Care Level: Beginner to Intermediate

Average Price: $270 – $600

Northern Diamondback Terrapin

Scientific Name: Malaclemys t. Terrapin

Average Size: 4.5 to 11 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 40 years

Habitat: The Northern diamondback terrapins live in brackish water, salt marshes, tidal creeks, estuaries, and coastal regions.

Diet: Fish, snail, insect, worm, etc.

Physical Appearance: Gray skin with black speckled is the distinguishing characteristic of Northern diamondback terrapins. The shell of these turtles ranges from brown to black with diamond-like patterns.

Conservation Status: Vulnerable

Care Level: Beginner and Intermediate

Average Price: $350 – $550

Texas Diamondback Terrapin

Scientific Name: Malaclemys Terrapin

Average Size: 4 – 9 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 40 years

Habitat: Saltwater marshes, tidal creeks, estuaries near the coast, etc.

Diet: Insect, crab, shrimp, shellfish, vegetation, etc.

Physical Appearance: Gray to faded black skin with black spots all over is the first thing you will notice in a Texas diamondback terrapin. Also, the brown to gray, wedge shaped shell with yellow to black dense ring on the scutes is another distinctive feature of this species.

Conservation Status: Vulnerable

Care Level: Beginner to Intermediate

Average Price: $250 – $300

Are you struggling to provide excellent care to your terrapin? Here are articles to help you in this journey.

Cooter

Eastern River Cooter

Scientific Name: Pseudemys concinna

Average Size: 8 – 16.5 inches

Average Lifespan: More than 40 years

Habitat: Shallow areas with vegetation and deep, clean water

Diet: Aquatic invertebrates, small fishes, snails, greens, vegetation, etc.

Physical Appearance: The carapace of the Eastern river cooters is greenish brown. Scutes on the shell sometimes include C shape patterns or markings.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Beginner to Intermediate

Average Price: $20 – $600

Missouri River Cooter

Scientific Name: Pseudemys Concinna Metteri

Average Size: 8 – 12 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 40 years

Habitat: River, streams, swamps, marshes, etc.

Diet: Vegetation, mussels, snails, insects, etc.

Physical Appearance: The carapace of the Missouri river cooters is slightly domed and of brown to olive. There are beautiful net-like patterns carved on their shells.

Conservation Status: Not Extinct

Care Level: Beginner to Intermediate

Average Price: $20 – $100

Rio Grande Cooter

Scientific Name: Pseudemys Gorzugi

Average Size: 8 – 14.6 inches

Average Lifespan: 20 – 40 years

Habitat: Freshwater rivers

Diet: Vegetation, plants, insects, fishes, etc.

Physical Appearance: While the carapace of the River Grande cooters is dark brown or olive, the plastron is yellow or red. You can separate this species by means of the jagged appearance around the edges. Moreover, these creatures have swirling red, orange, or yellow lines on their shells.

Conservation Status: Near Threatened

Care Level: Beginner to Intermediate

Average Price: $70 – $130

Texas River Cooter

Scientific Name: Pseudemys Texana

Average Size: 7 – 12 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 44 years

Habitat: Shallow freshwater rivers

Diet: Grasses, plants, algae, small fishes, crustaceans, etc.

Physical Appearance: The Texas river cooters also have a brown to the olive shell with swirling orange or yellow lines. Besides, these turtles have vertical yellow stripes behind their eyes, which make them stand out.

Conservation Status: Least concern

Care Level: Beginner to intermediate

Average Price: $20 – $50

Northern Red Bellied Cooter

Scientific Name: Pseudemys rubriventris

Average Size: 8 – 16 inches

Average Lifespan: 55 years

Habitat: Water bodies with sandy bottoms

Diet: Vegetation, mollusk, insect, invertebrate, etc.

Physical Appearance: From the name, you can guess that the plastron of these turtles is red. Besides, dark brown to olive carapace has red lines, and their dark skin has yellow markings.

Conservation Status: Near Threatened

Care Level: Beginner to Intermediate

Average Price: $30 – $170

Florida Cooter

Scientific Name: Pseudemys floridana

Average Size: 8 – 13 inches

Average Lifespan: More than 40 years

Habitat: Coastal plains, swamps, rivers, wetlands, marshes with sandy bottoms and a little vegetation

Diet: Plant, small vegetation, algae, crustaceans, insects, etc.

Physical Appearance: Florida cooters have similarities to the Eastern ones. The differences can be spotted in the carapace. This species has a dark carapace with orange or yellow markings.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Beginner to Intermediate

Average Price: $20 – $50

Florida Red Bellied Cooter

Scientific Name: Pseudemysnelsoni

Average Size: 12 – 14 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 55 years

Habitat: Slow-moving rivers, ponds, lakes, marshes, canals, etc.

Diet: Plants, leaves, green leafy vegetables, etc.

Physical Appearance: Florida red bellied cooters have domed, smooth shells that are often dark olive. The plastron of this species is yellow or orange.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $19 – $200

Peninsula Cooter

Scientific Name: Pseudemys peninsularis

Average Size: 9 – 16 inches

Average Lifespan: 30 years

Habitat: Basin and tidal marshes, swamps, ponds, rivers, lakes, etc.

Diet: Aquatic vegetation, green leafy vegetables, worms, insects, etc.

Physical Appearance: The limbs and heads of the Peninsula cooters are dark and covered with yellow or orange lines. Again, the males are generally smaller and rounder in shape.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $25 – $50

Eastern Redbelly Cooter

Scientific Name: Pseudemys rubriventris

Average Size: 5 – 12 inches

Average Lifespan: 40 – 55 years

Habitat: River and ponds with a sandy bottom

Diet: Insect, mollusk, vegetation, etc.

Physical Appearance: The red plastron is the distinguishing feature of the red-bellied turtles. The carapace of the species is black to olive green and covered with red lines. Some turtles have yellow stripes on the skin.

Conservation Status: Near Threatened

Care Level: Beginner to Intermediate

Average Price: $20 – $170

Map turtle

Common Map Turtle

Scientific Name: Graptemys geographica

Average Size: 3.5 to 10.5 inches

Average Lifespan: 30 – 50 years

Habitat: River bottom. Pond, lake, etc.

Diet: Snail, insect, crayfish, clam, etc.

Physical Appearance: The shells of map turtles are dark brown or olive, covered with yellow lines. The carapace of this species seems like a carved map at first glance. You will notice yellow spots behind the eyes of the map turtles.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $20 – $150

Cagle’s Map Turtle

Scientific Name: Graptemys Caglei

Average Size: 3 – 10 inches

Average Lifespan: 30 – 50 years

Habitat: Creeks and rivers

Diet: Tadpole, worm, insect, etc.

Physical Appearance: A dark shell, keels running in the center, serrated rear, and cream or yellow stripes on the head are primary features of Cagle’s map turtles.

Conservation Status: Endangered

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $100 – $300

Mississippi Map Turtle

Scientific Name: Graptemys Pseudogeographica Kohnii

Average Size: 3 – 11 inches

Average Lifespan: 30 – 50 years

Habitat: Lake, large streams, rivers, etc.

Diet: Vegetation, insects, larvae, carrion, crayfish, etc.

Physical Appearance: The Mississippi map turtles have dark brown to black shells with yellow markings running on the carapace. These turtles also have a sharp keel running down towards the tail.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $15 – $200

Ouachita Map Turtle

Scientific Name: Graptemys Ouachitensis

Average Size: 3 – 10 inches

Average Lifespan: 30 – 50 years

Habitat: Fast-moving water sources with vegetation

Diet: Insect, worm, shrimp, small fish, vegetation, etc.

Physical Appearance: From dark shells to keels on the back, the Ouachita map turtles have the traditional map turtle look. However, lightly colored patches behind the eyes are their distinctive feature.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $40 – $100

Sabine Map Turtle

Scientific Name: Graptemys Sabinensis

Average Size: 3 – 10 inches

Average Lifespan: More than 50 years

Habitat: Rivers and freshwater bodies

Diet: Invertebrate, mollusk, plants, etc.

Physical Appearance: The shells of the Sabine turtles are brown to olive and have black-tipped ridges on them. Also, the scutes have similar patterns to the map turtles. The plastron of this species is yellow to cream.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $15 – $230

Texas Map Turtle

Scientific Name: Graptemys Versa

Average Size: 2.5 – 5 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 50 years

Habitat: Fast-moving river, stream, and water body

Diet: Aquatic plants, invertebrates, small fish, insects, etc.

Physical Appearance: Texas map turtles and Sabine map turtles look alike. Both have ridges on the brown to olive shells and tipped keels.

Conservation Status: Endangered

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: Pricey (Ask your local pet store)

Barbour’s Map Turtle

Scientific Name: Graptemys barbouri

Average Size: 6 – 11 inches

Average Lifespan: 15 – 20 years

Habitat: Freshwater sources

Diet: Insects, worms, molluscs, amphibians, etc.

Physical Appearance: Barbour’s map turtles have black and green skin with yellow stripes. The spikes on the grey, oval shell are the distinct feature of this species.

Conservation Status: Protected Species

False Map Turtle

Scientific Name: Graptemys pseudogeographica pseudogeographica

Average Size: 3 – 10 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 50 years

Habitat: Freshwater sources

Diet: Pellets, insects, vegetables, plants, etc.

Physical Appearance: The shells of False map turtles range from brown to black and have yellow contouring. Besides, these creatures have keels on their carapace, which is why the species is often called sawback turtles.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $6 – $50

Alabama Map Turtle

Scientific Name: Graptemys Pulchra

Average Size: 3.5 to 11 inches

Average Lifespan: More than 20 years

Habitat: Fast-flowing water bodies with a muddy bottom

Diet: Mussels, mollusks, insects, etc.

Physical Appearance: The Alabama map turtles have a brown or dark olive carapace where faint yellow or orange lines run all over.

Conservation Status: Near Threatened

Care Level: Beginner

It is easy to raise a map turtle with proper tricks. Master the care sheet on map turtles from here.

Slider

Yellow Bellied Slider

Scientific Name: Trachemys s. scripta

Average Size: 5 – 13 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 50 years

Habitat: Slow-moving river, swamp, marshes, lake, seasonal wetland, lake, etc.

Diet: Aquatic vegetation, insects, mollusks, small fish, etc.

Physical Appearance: You can spot a yellow bellied slider with yellow plastron and yellow markings on the skin. The turtle also has yellow stripes behind the eyes.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $10 – $100

Red Eared Slider

Scientific Name: Trachemys scripta elegans

Average Size: 6 – 12 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 40 years

Habitat: Slow-moving river, creek, stream, pond, swamp, lake, etc.

Diet: Insect, worm, small fish, plants, etc.

Physical Appearance: The red eared sliders have an olive green shell with yellow stripes. These yellow markings run throughout the skin. However, the distinguishing feature of these turtles is the red patches on the ears.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $15 – $120

Cumberland Slider

Scientific Name: Trachemys Scripta Troostii

Average Size: 5 – 12 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 50 years

Habitat: Quiet water bodies with a muddy bottom

Diet: Tadpole, insect, crayfish, seed, plant, etc.

Physical Appearance: Unlike other sliders, the Cumberland sliders are light yellow colored. And yes, the red ears are missing in these turtles.

Conservation Status: Not Extinct

Care Level: Intermediate

Average Price: $17 – $70

Big Bend Slider

Scientific Name: Trachemys Gaigeae

Average Size: 5 – 11 inches

Average Lifespan: More than 30 years

Habitat: River and pond

Diet: Vegetation, mollusk, small fish, crustacean, etc.

Physical Appearance: The big bend sliders belong to the famous slider group. This species has brown to olive carapace covered with yellow to orange lines. The orange stripes behind their eyes bordered with black are the unique features of these turtles.

Conservation Status: Vulnerable

Care Level: Beginner

Sliders are popular pets. But people often make common mistakes with them. Find out the right way of raising sliders from here.

Painted Turtle

Painted Turtle

Scientific Name: Chrysemys picta

Average Size: 4 – 10 inches

Average Lifespan: 30 – 50 years

Habitat: Quiet and still shallow pool, lake, shore, pond, wet meadow, marshes, slow-moving streams, bogs, etc.

Diet: Small fish, mammals, mollusks, insects, vegetation, plants, etc.

Physical Appearance: Painted turtles have black to the dark brown carapace and a tan, yellow plastron. You will notice yellow markings on the faces and throats of these turtles.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $20 – $150

Eastern Painted Turtle

Scientific Name: Chrysemys picta picta

Average Size: 4 – 10 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 50 years

Habitat: Lake, ponds, and other slow-moving water sources

Diet: Small animals, crustaceans, small fish, carrion, aquatic plants, etc.

Physical Appearance: The edges of the dark shells of Eastern painted turtles are marked red or yellow. Besides, deep yellow stripes are also seen on their faces.

Conservation Status: Not Extinct

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $80 – $250

Southern Painted Turtle

Scientific Name: Chrysemys dorsalis

Average Size: 5 – 7 inches

Average Lifespan: 20 – 25 years

Habitat: Lake, pond, river, marshes, swamp, etc.

Diet: Aquatic vegetation, worms, insects, etc.

Physical Appearance: Southern painted turtles have smooth dark carapace and yellow to orange marks.

Conservation Status: Not Extinct

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $70 – $200

Western Painted Turtle

Scientific Name: Chrysemys Picta Belli

Average Size: 4 – 10 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 40 years

Habitat: Shallow and slow-moving water sources

Diet: Seed, plant, fruits, snail, shrimp, etc.

Physical Appearance: The carapace of the Western painted turtles is black or dark olive, and the plastron of this species is orange or mixed color.

Conservation Status: Not Extinct

Care Level: Beginner

Average Price: $30 – $130

Blanding’s Turtle

Blanding’s Turtle

Scientific Name: Emydoidea blandingii

Average Size: 6 – 11 inches

Average Lifespan: 75 – 80 years

Habitat: Pond, swamp, creeks, sloughs, weedy marshes, lake backwaters, etc.

Diet: Fish, crustaceans, snails, insects, mollusks, worms, vegetables, etc.

Physical Appearance: The Blanding’s turtle has a dome-like and smooth dark oval shell covered in yellow tints. The plastron of this turtle is yellow and contains dark patches. Again, the yellowish throat is a standout point of this species.

Conservation Status: Threatened

Care Level: Intermediate

Average Price: $300 – $500

Get an insight into the painted turtle from my previous write ups.

Chicken Turtle

Eastern Chicken Turtle

Scientific Name: Deirochelys reticularia reticularia

Average Size: 4 – 10 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 30 years

Habitat: Wetlands with slow-moving streams

Diet: Insect, amphibian larvae, crayfish, etc.

Physical Appearance: The chicken turtles are popular for their chicken-like long neck. Besides, the species has green shells with yellow marks.

Conservation Status: Endangered

Care Level: Intermediate

Average Price: $120 – $300

Western Chicken Turtle

Scientific Name: Deirochelys Reticularia Miaria

Average Size: 4 – 6 inches

Average Lifespan: 20 years

Habitat: Swamp, streams, ponds, lakes, etc.

Diet: Plants, veggies, insects, small fishes, etc.

Physical Appearance: Western chicken turtles have flat and rough egg-shaped shells. The carapace of these turtles is dark olive with faint lines, and the plastron seam has a continuous dark mark.

Conservation Status: Endangered

Care Level: Expert

Florida Chicken Turtle

Scientific Name: Deirochelys Reticularia Chrysea

Average Size: 4 – 6 inches

Average Lifespan: More than 20 years

Habitat: Freshwater bodies

Diet: Amphibian larvae, crayfish, insects, worms, etc.

Physical Appearance: The Florida chicken turtles have striped shells. Also, their carapaces own orange to yellow lines while the plastron is markless.

Conservation Status: Not Extinct

Care Level: Expert

Average Price: $150++

Pond Turtle

Western Pond Turtle

Scientific Name: Actinemys marmorata

Average Size: 7 – 9 inches

Average Lifespan: 50 – 70 years

Habitat: Small lakes, marshes, ponds, creeks, rivers, ditches, etc.

Diet: Beetle, flies, grasshopper, seeds, plants, etc.

Physical Appearance: The Western pond turtle’s carapace is low but broad and smooth. The middle portion is slightly wider. These turtles have the same olive carapace as the other pond turtles.

Conservation Status: Endangered

Care Level: Expert

Average Price: $500++

Softshell Turtle

Spiny Softshell Turtle

Scientific Name: Apalone s. spinifera

Average Size: 5 – 17 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 70 years

Habitat: High current streams and rivers

Diet: Fish, mollusk, insect, crustaceans, etc.

Physical Appearance: A pancake shaped soft carapace is the differentiator for the Spiny softshell turtles. Their shells are olive-gray to dark brown with small dark spots. The softshell turtles have snouts for breathing.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Intermediate to Expert

Average Price: $50 – $280

Florida Softshell turtle

Scientific Name: Apalone ferox

Average Size: 6 – 12 inches

Average Lifespan: More than 50 years

Habitat: Drainage ditch, pond, river, stream, etc.

Diet: Stripe, fish, insect, worm, etc.

Physical Appearance: The leathery, pancake-like carapace of the Florida softshell turtles is dark brown to olive. Again, the plastron of these turtles is white or grey.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Expert

Average Price: $50 – $200

Gulf Coast Smooth Softshell Turtle

Scientific Name: Apalone mutica calvata

Average Size: 4 – 14 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 25 years

Habitat: fast-moving water with a sandy bottom

Diet: Cricket, worm, fish, mollusk, etc.

Physical Appearance: Gulf Coast smooth softshell turtles have brown or tanned shells with dark markings. Generally, the male turtles have a darker and smaller appearance.

Conservation Status: Moderate Concern

Care Level: Intermediate to Expert

Average Price: $40 – $60

Midland Smooth Softshell Turtle

Scientific Name: Apalone Mutica Mutica

Average Size: 4 – 14 inches

Average Lifespan: More than 25 years

Habitat: Large rivers and water bodies with a sandy bottom

Diet: Insect, crayfish, mollusk, fish, etc.

Physical Appearance: Midland smooth softshell turtles have leather shells like softshell turtles. Besides, these turtles have gray and brown lines on the eyes and snouts.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Intermediate to Expert

Average Price: $50 – $150

Eastern Spiny Softshell Turtle

Scientific Name: Apalone spinifera

Average Size: 5 – 21 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 50 years

Habitat: Rivers and streams

Diet: Insects, worms, crustaceans, small fish, etc.

Physical Appearance: The eastern spiny softshell turtles have the same oval, pancake-like shell with random dark spots. These turtles have a tapered snout which helps them breathe while burrowed in the sand.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Care Level: Intermediate to Expert

Average Price: $70 – $270

Gulf Coast Spiny Softshell Turtle

Scientific Name: Apalone spinifera aspera

Average Size: 5 – 19 inches

Average Lifespan: Up to 50 years

Habitat: Farm ponds, marshes, rivers, lakes, etc.

Diet: Worm, insect, fish, mollusk, etc.

Physical Appearance: Besides the pancake-like shell, the Gulf Coast spiny softshell turtles have black bars running on the carapace. Also, the scutes have ring patterns like other species.

Conservation Status: Endangered

Care Level: Intermediate

Average Price: $70 – $300

Texas Spiny Softshell Turtle

Scientific Name: Apalone spinifera emoryi

Average Size: 5 – 21 inches

Average Lifespan: 50 years

Habitat: River and other freshwater bodies

Diet: Fish, insect, carrion, bug, etc.

Physical Appearance: The Texas spiny softshell turtles have a leathery shell on the back. You can differentiate this species from the rest with the two black-edged yellow stripes on each side of their head and neck.

Conservation Status: Not Extinct

Softshell turtles are fun as a pet. I have included a complete care guide on these turtles here.

Sea Turtle

Green Sea Turtle

Scientific Name: Chelonia mydas

Average Size: 3 – 4 feet

Average Lifespan: 70 – 100 years

Habitat: Near the coastline and around the island

Diet: Algae, seaweed, seagrass, etc.

Physical Appearance: The green sea turtles have green to brown heart-like shells with yellow edges. Their skin is creamy with a green shade.

Conservation Status: Endangered

Hawksbill Sea Turtle

Scientific Name: Eretmochelys i. imbricata

Average Size: 2 – 3 feet

Average Lifespan: 30 – 60 years

Habitat: Shallow coastal areas with reefs, rocks, and estuaries.

Diet: crustaceans, mollusks, algae, etc.

Physical Appearance: The Atlantic Hawksbill sea turtles have an oval shell and a hawk-like beak. Their flippers have claws.

Conservation Status: Critically endangered

Ridley Sea Turtle

Scientific Name: Lepidochelys kempii

Average Size: More than 2 feet

Average Lifespan: 30 years

Habitat: Sandy coastal areas with shallow water bodies

Diet: Shellfish, crustaceans, etc.

Physical Appearance: Triangle shaped head and a hook-like beak are the differentiative characteristics of Ridley sea turtles. The rounded carapace is gray, and the plastron is yellow.

Conservation Status: critically Engendered

Loggerhead Sea Turtle

Scientific Name: Caretta caretta

Average Size: 3 – 4 feet

Average Lifespan: 70 – 80 years

Habitat: Sub-tropical water, sandy beach, coastal region, shallow bay, etc.

Diet: Crustacean, mollusk, shellfish, etc.

Physical Appearance: The loggerhead sea turtles have large heads along with a hard shell. While the carapace of these turtles is reddish brown, the plastron is cream to yellow.

Conservation Status: Endangered

Leatherback Sea Turtle

Scientific Name: Dermochelys coriacea

Average Size: 6 – 7 feet

Average Lifespan: Up to 50 years

Habitat: Shallow and warm waters near the bays and lagoons

Diet: Jellyfish and other marine creatures

Physical Appearance: The soft leathery shell with prominent ridges is the key feature of this species. Their shell color can range from dark gray to black.

Conservation Status: Vulnerable

Olive Ridley Sea Turtle

Scientific Name: Lepidochelys olivacea

Average Size: 2 – 2.5 feet

Average Lifespan: 50 years

Habitat: Deep sea and coastal areas

Diet: Crab, lobster, algae, mollusc, etc.

Physical Appearance: Of course, the Olive Ridley sea turtles have an olive carapace. Also, the shell has a slightly hearty shape that adds more cuteness to the look of this species.

Conservation Status: Vulnerable

Sea turtles are a mystery to most of us. Get to know these divine creatures more closely from these articles.

Final Thoughts

Do you know why experts always advise getting a native turtle? It is because the creature feels more homely in its region. For this reason, you should go through the list of your native turtles before buying a foreign species. It will save your energy and make a better home for the pet.

Muntaseer Rahman

I have been keeping turtles as a pet for many years now. I’ve fallen in love with these cute pets from the moment I saw them. That’s why I am writing articles to share my turtle keeping knowledge with you.

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